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Memoirs of a Funeral Director.

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There is a lot we can learn about the death care industry from the often witty, sometimes humorous, always genuine memoirs of Funeral Directors, Undertakers, and Morticians. 

    Smoke Gets in Your Eyes

    THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER'Unforgettable . . . a hilarious, poignant and impassioned plea to revolutionise our attitudes to death' Gavin Francis, GuardianFrom her first day at Westwind Cremation & Burial, twenty-three-year-old Caitlin Doughty threw herself into her curious new profession. Coming face-to-face with the very thing we go to great lengths to avoid thinking about she started to wonder about the lives of those she cremated and the mourning families they left behind, and found herself confounded by people's erratic reactions to death. Exploring our death rituals - and those of other cultures - she pleads the case for healthier attitudes around death and dying. Full of bizarre encounters, gallows humour and vivid characters (both living and very dead), this illuminating account makes this otherwise terrifying subject inviting and fascinating.

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    The Undertaker's Daughter

    'On the last day of 1959 my father, the Beau Brummel of morticians, piled us into his green and white Desoto in which we looked like a moving pack of Salem cigarettes. He drove away from Lanesboro, the city in which we all were born, and into a small town on the Kentucky and Tennessee border. It was only a ninety-minute drive, but it might as well have been to Alaska. When our big boat of a car glided into Jubilee we circled the town square and headed towards the residential section of Main Street. My father pulled the car over and our five dark heads turned to face a huge, slightly run down house. My parents were total strangers to this tiny enclave, but it didn't matter because my father had finally realised his dream in this old house, which was to own his own funeral home.'

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    Does This Mean You'll See Me Naked?

    He answers those embarrassing questions foremost in our minds and provides readers with behind-the scenes stories of what really goes on after you're dead with both empathy and humor that satisfies readers curious about the oddities of death. What kind of person becomes a funeral director? How difficult is the art of making Grandma look like Grandma again? What's the biggest ripoff in the business?

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    Latvian-Canadian, Hard of Hearing mother of three. I love reading, writing, and playing video games. I live in a cemetery and aspire to be a Funeral Director.

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