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Eighteenth-century fashion

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A collection of books on eighteenth-century garment construction, textiles, embroidery and related subjects. 

The American Duchess Guide to 18th Century Dressmaking

With the popularity of Outlander, Penny Dreadful and Game of Thrones - as well as the popularity of conventions like San Diego Comic Con - fans are eager to create period gowns that emulate the characters they love. Lauren Stowell and Abby Cox, owners of the popular online store American Duchess, have teamed together to recreate four complete dresses from the 18th century. Whether readers are experienced seamstresses or are new to hand sewing, they won't want to miss this comprehensive guide. The projects include The English Gown, The Sacque, The Italian Gown and The Round Gown. Each project is broken down into easy-to-follow steps and Lauren and Abby tackle every detail - fabric, patterns, stitch techniques, accessories, shortcuts and troubleshooting. Whether you choose a romantic 1790s muslin gown or a grand sacque gown of silk taffeta, you will feel like you just stepped out of your favorite novel or period of history. Lauren and Abby's company, American Duchess, has been featured on Late Night with Seth Meyers, Reno Gazette Journal, the Today Show and Garmz.com. Their historically accurate shoes have been used in productions by the New York Metropolitan Opera, Ford's Theater, Broadway's Cinderella, The Jimmy Fallon Show and The Knick. Lauren and Abby have over 32k Facebook followers and over 34k followers on Instagram.

18th Century Embroidery Techniques

This is a highly readable and fascinating look at 18th century embroidery techniques, from a U.K. author. It includes relevant quotations from ladies and gentlemen of the period as well as drawings of costume pieces. It features colour photographs of museum-held pieces with annotations throughout. Gail Marsh's research is presented here in a highly readable and fascinating manner, with relevant quotations from people of the period, intricate drawings of costume pieces, annotated with the stitches, threads and techniques that were used, plus colour photographs of the museum-held pieces. This enthralling book is a must for any student studying embroidery, fashion and textiles, craft persons interested in historical embroidery techniques, creators of historical costume for stage.

Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Fashion in Detail

This sumptuously illustrated book reveals the decorative seams, exquisite stitching, voluptuous drapery, strict corseting and slashing and stamping that make up the clothing in the V&A's superlative seventeenth and eighteenth-century fashion collection. Using an authoritative text, exquisite colour photography and line drawings of complete garments, the reader is allowed the unique opportunity to look closely at clothing, often too fragile to be on display. Part of the "V&A Fashion in Detail" series, "Seventeenth and Eighteenth-Century Fashion in Detail" is an inspirational resource for students, designers, collectors and all followers of fashion. This title was previously available as "Historical Fashion in Detail".

Wearable Prints, 1760-1860

Wearable prints are not only a decorative art form but also the product of a range of complex industrial processes and an economically important commodity. But when did textile printing originate, and how can we identify the fabrics, inks, dyes, and printing processes used on surviving historical examples? In Wearable Prints, 1760-1860, author Susan Greene surveys the history of wearable printed fabrics, which reaches back into the earliest days of the discovery of the delights of selectively patterned cloth and is firmly interwoven with the Industrial Revolution. The bulk of the book is devoted to the process of printing and dyeing. Greene brings together evidence from period publications and manuscripts, extant period garments and quilts, and scholarship on eighteenth- and nineteenth-century chemistry and technology. Making the text come alive, Greene includes some 1600 full-color images, including a plentiful array of textile samples. Wearable Prints, 1760-1860 is a convenient encyclopedic guide, written in plain language accessible to even the most casual reader. Historians, students, costumers, quilters, designers, curators, and collectors will find it an essential resource.

The Cut of Men's Clothes

This book traces the evolution of the style of men's dress through a sequence of diagrams accurately scaled down from patterns of actual garments, many of them rare museum specimens. The plates have been selected with the same purpose. Some are photographs of suits for which diagrams have also been given; others, reproduced from paintings and old prints, show the costume complete with its accessories. Quotations from contemporary sources--from diaries, travelers' accounts and tailors' bills--supplement Norah Waugh's text with comments on fashion and lively eyewitness descriptions.

The Cut of Women's Clothes

This is a vivid record, in words, illustrations and working diagrams, of a section of women's clothing design from 1600 to 1930. The author was in charge of costume at the Theatre Studio run by Michel Saint-Denis in the 1930s.

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Joanna has twice won certificates of honour (and a free beer) for demonstrating “extraordinary courage against the unsurmountable Phaal”, a ludicrously spicy curry.

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