Shirley Jackson

Shirley Jackson

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Shirley Hardie Jackson was an American writer.
Born in San Francisco, California in 1916, she began writing poetry and short stories as a young teenager.
She graduated from Syracuse University in 1940, where she published her first story, Janice and was soon appointed fiction editor of the campus humor magazine. At Syracuse she met her future husband, young aspiring literary critic Stanley Edgar Hyman, and together they founded a literary magazine, Spectre.


Shirley Jackson is considered one of the most brilliant and influential authors of the twentieth century, and she is widely acclaimed for her stories and novels of the supernatural, including the well-known short story The Lottery and the best-selling novel The Haunting of Hill House.


She was awarded numerous prizes including Best American Short Stories 1944, O. Henry Prize Stories 1949, Best American Short Stories 1951, Best American Short Stories 1956, Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe Award for Best Short Story 1961, Time magazine's "Ten Best Novels" of the year 1962, Best American Short Stories 1964, Mystery Writers of America Edgar Allan Poe Award for Best Short Story 1966, New York Times Book Review's Best Fiction of 1966 and the New York Times Book Review's Best Fiction of 1968.
The Shirley Jackson Award was established in 2007 for outstanding achievement in the literature of psychological suspense, horror, and the dark fantastic.


Shirley Jackson died of heart failure in her sleep, at her home in North Bennington in 1965.