Henri Bergson

Henri Bergson

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Henri-Louis Bergson (18 October 1859 – 4 January 1941) was a French philosopher, influential especially in the first half of the 20th century and after WWII in continental philosophy. In 1888, Bergson submitted two doctoral theses in Paris: Essai sur les données immédiates de la conscience, published as a book (Time and Free Will) in 1889. Bergson's second book, Matter and Memory, appeared in 1896. This book led to Bergson's election to the Collège de France. Finally, in 1932, he surprised everyone with the publication of his last major book, The Two Sources of Morality and Religion, which gave rise to renewed debates and misunderstandings about his philosophy and his religious orientation. The final collection of his essays, The Creative Mind, appeared in 1934. Bergson was awarded the 1927 Nobel Prize in Literature "in recognition of his rich and vitalizing ideas and the brilliant skill with which they have been presented". In 1930 France awarded him its highest honour, the Grand-Croix de la Legion d'honneur.